Archive for the ‘Class X03’ Category

Fun Halloween Stuff!~~~~~

October 12, 2017

ClassX03University Halloween

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Jack O Lanterns <~~~Read about the history of Jack O Lanterns~jack-o-lantern.gif

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History of Halloween

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Halloween.com

http://www.benjerry.com/halloween/

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August VACATION

August 12, 2017

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Seeee Youuuu Innn Septemberrrr…..

Calendar

July 14, 2017

Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are found only in shallow, warm water. The water temperature is usually constant year round. The reef is made up of thousands of corals.

When a coral dies, it leaves its skeleton of calcium carbonate behind. Young corals attach themselves to the old skeleton and the cycle starts again. Each new generation is built upon the remains of the previous generation.


Threats to Coral Reefs

Human Contact Touching Reefs, even slightly, can harm them. Boats and dropped anchors can cause severe damage to these fragile ecosystems. Frequent human contact kills the reefs over time.
Runoff Water Silt from eroded soil in runoff water can block sunlight. Without sunlight, photosynthesis does not occur and reefs gradually die.
Sewage Untreated or improperly treated sewage promotes the growth of algae, which harms coral reefs.
Cyanide Fishing Some fishermen stun fish by squirting cyanide, a very toxic poison, into reef areas where fish seek refuge. The poison does not kill, but disorients the fish in the coral where they hide. The fisherman then rip apart the reefs with crowbars to capture the fish. In addition, cyanide kills coral polyps and the symbiotic algae and other small organisms necessary for healthy reefs. Cyanide fishing is common in the South Pacific and Southeast Asia.
Fertilizers & Pollution Fertilizer runoff, pesticides and other chemicals can poison reefs.
Blast Fishing Shock waves from blast fishing can destroy coral reefs.

Go Green

July 6, 2017

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Earth Day Every Day

Green Classroom Ideas

Green is In…

July 6, 2017

Rain Forests

July 3, 2017

All About the Rain Forests around the World1101-00640

X03 Celebrates our RainForests

July 2, 2017

Rainforest Webquest

Animals of the Rainforests Webquest

Save the Rainforest Webquest

Tropical Treasure Hunt

Rainforest Rendezvous

 

 

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History of April Fools Day~

March 29, 2017

Unlike most of the other nonfoolish holidays, the history of April Fool’s Day, sometimes called All Fool’s Day, is not totally clear. There really wasn’t a “first April Fool’s Day” that can be pinpointed on the calendar. Some believe it sort of evolved simultaneously in several cultures at the same time, from celebrations involving the first day of spring.

The closest point in time that can be identified as the beginning of this tradition was in 1582, in France. Prior to that year, the new year was celebrated for eight days, beginning on March 25. The celebration culminated on April 1. With the reform of the calendar under Charles IX, the Gregorian Calendar was introduced, and New Year’s Day was moved to January 1.

However, communications being what they were in the days when news traveled by foot, many people did not receive the news for several years. Others, the more obstinate crowd, refused to accept the new calendar and continued to celebrate the new year on April 1. These backward folk were labeled as “fools” by the general populace. They were subject to some ridicule, and were often sent on “fools errands” or were made the butt of other practical jokes.

This harassment evolved, over time, into a tradition of prank-playing on the first day of April. The tradition eventually spread to England and Scotland in the eighteenth century. It was later introduced to the American colonies of both the English and French. April Fool’s Day thus developed into an international fun fest, so to speak, with different nationalities specializing in their own brand of humor at the expense of their friends and families.

In Scotland, for example, April Fool’s Day is actually celebrated for two days. The second day is devoted to pranks involving the posterior region of the body. It is called Taily Day. The origin of the “kick me” sign can be traced to this observance.

Mexico’s counterpart of April Fool’s Day is actually observed on December 28. Originally, the day was a sad remembrance of the slaughter of the innocent children by King Herod. It eventually evolved into a lighter commemoration involving pranks and trickery.

Pranks performed on April Fool’s Day range from the simple, (such as saying, “Your shoe’s untied!), to the elaborate. Setting a roommate’s alarm clock back an hour is a common gag. Whatever the prank, the trickster usually ends it by yelling to his victim, “April Fool!”

Practical jokes are a common practice on April Fool’s Day. Sometimes, elaborate practical jokes are played on friends or relatives that last the entire day. The news media even gets involved. For instance, a British short film once shown on April Fool’s Day was a fairly detailed documentary about “spaghetti farmers” and how they harvest their crop from the spaghetti trees.

April Fool’s Day is a “for-fun-only” observance. Nobody is expected to buy gifts or to take their “significant other” out to eat in a fancy restaurant. Nobody gets off work or school. It’s simply a fun little holiday, but a holiday on which one must remain forever vigilant, for he may be the next April Fool!

Poetry Month~

March 27, 2017

 

Vernal Equinox

March 9, 2017

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Vernal Equinox

http://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/march-equinox.html